Gail Garber Designs
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Gail's Quilting Blog

New Year and New Beginnings

As I sit down to write this I realize that it has been almost a month since my last post.   I apologize for slacking off during the holidays this year.  However, even though I haven’t been posting, I have not been idle!

Butterfly Filigree

Butterfly Filigree  

Many thanks go to my longtime friend and colleague, Donna Barnitz, who came up with the idea for the filigree work.  The butterflies are part of a quilt in progress and this was our first attempt, using UltraSuede and hand painted fabrics from Mickey Lawler, of SkyDyes.  This work in progress let loose an entire Pandora’s box of ideas for similar work.  Next up on my list of projects was to design the Hawks Aloft raffle quilt for 2014.  (Pam Eastman, of Edgewood, NM, won the 2013 quilt.)

Cooper's Hawk in Flight.  Image by Doug Brown.

Cooper’s Hawk in Flight. Image by Doug Brown.

Through my work at Hawks Aloft, I am very fortunate to know some incredible photographers, like Doug Brown, who allow us to use their images in our public outreach, and social media pages.  Donna and I came up with the idea of doing a filigree bird for the 2014 quilt.  Actually, the idea was more hers than mine.  So, we started looking at Doug’s images and settled on the above image of a juvenile Cooper’s Hawk in flight.  Of course, our work would only be an interpretation of the image, not a literal translation.

One Hawk

One Hawk

The silhouette of the hawk fit perfectly into the space that it needed to fill.  Donna traced the shapes onto fusible web that we then fused to UltraSuede.  Then, we cut out the shapes including all the filigree spaces within the larger shape.  Donna thought that adding an emblem unique to New Mexico, would enhance the overall design, hence the Zia symbol.  We divided up the cutting out process among five of us, Donna, Afton Warrick, Mary Chappelle, Laurie Marnell and yours truly.  Once those were cut out, we cut another piece of fabric, a batik, and placed it beneath the UltraSuede and fused everything to a background.  All was well, except that we weren’t comfortable that the fusible would be secure enough without extra stitching.  And, we had only seven days in which to complete all 12 of the hawks!!!

Afton Warrick and Donna Barnitz

Afton Warrick and Donna Barnitz

We had a stitching party two days ago, with the goal of getting all the zigzag stitching around the outside of the hawks.  Donna, Afton, Laurie and Laurie’s dog, Barry, joined me!  Oh, what fun we had!

Laurie and Barry

Laurie and Barry

Barry was especially helpful as he helped folks do special things, like washing our hands with his large tongue and wagging tail.  Actually, the best part was that Barry got along so well with my dogs, Gabby and Laney, that they wore each other out and had to take loooong naps later in the afternoon.

The Sewers - Laurie Afton Donna Barnitz, and Laurie Marnell

The Sewers – Laurie Marnell,  Afton Warrick, Donna Barnitz

We began stitching at 10:30 a.m. and by 3 p.m. all 12 hawks had been secured with Superior Threads Invisible Polyester Thread.  We stuck them to my design wall so we could photograph our handiwork.

Afton the Angel

Afton the Angel

Afton even sprouted a pair of wings for her angelic efforts!

Birds on Design Wall

Birds on Design Wall

And, here they are – 12 hawks adorning the wall, interspersed with other works in progress.  After my sewing buddies all went home, one more task remained: trimming all the hawk blocks to size and stitching the circular border together.  Then, I also added the outer border to square it up!

Raffle Quilt 2014 - Sneak Peek

Raffle Quilt 2014 – Sneak Peek

And here it is!  The official Quilt Retreat takes place next weekend at the cabin in the Jemez Mountains.  We will have 12 quilters on hand, and we hope to complete the remainder of the quilt top in one day!  Do you think we can do it?

Stay tuned . . .

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Back at Home: Rainbow Crow Class at Bernina Sewing Center

Oh, what fun we have at our local Bernina dealer, Ann Silva’s Bernina Sewing Center!  I taught a two session class on my Rainbow Crow design on two consecutive Saturdays.  Nine wonderful students joined me, including an 80-year-old quilter!

Rainbow Crow by Gail Garber

Rainbow Crow by Gail Garber

Each was given the pattern, and instruction covered freezer paper foundation piecing and curved seam piecing.  At the end of the first class, students went home with some pieces completed and a lot of homework.  I worried that it might be too much homework!  But . . .

Rainbow Crow in Progress

Rainbow Crow in Progress

almost everyone returned with all their foundations stitched, or mostly stitched.  So we focused on curved seam assembly in the second class.  And, look what happened!

Rainbow Crow Class at Bernina Sewing Center, Albuquerque

Rainbow Crow Class at Bernina Sewing Center, Albuquerque

Didn’t they do great?  Check out the Rainbow Crow on the left.  She used this wonderful feather print that made her piece just sing, like the beautiful voice of the Rainbow Crow.  I have proposed to teach this class at International Quilt Festival in 2014.  I hope they select this class for me to teach!  My students are the BEST!!!!

 

 

 

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International Quilt Festival – Old Friends and New

One of the best things about International Quilt Festival is seeing my friends from afar, and meeting new friends. Some of my best friends in the whole world are people I met through quilting – a very special breed!

Diane Anderson, from Auckland, New Zealand, and Yours Truly

Diane Anderson, from Auckland, New Zealand, and Yours Truly

This year, I was thrilled to be able to spend time with Diane Anderson, and her husband Terry!  The first night of the big show, (and the night that I forgot to make a reservation at the Hilton, we all crowded into Janice Schindeler and Harry Crofton‘s lovely home in medical center area, where we all enjoyed a light repast and some bubbly!

Anna Sexton and her Little House of Geese, from class.

Anna Sexton and her Little House of Geese, from class.

Monday morning it was off to class, where I taught Little House of Geese, one of my favorite classes, and one in which students are very successful.  However, no one every finished the project in the six hour class.  But, the next day, Anna Sexton walked into my next class to show off her completed quilt top!  Beautiful, Anna!

Later in the week, I taught a design class in which students work through a series of exercises and then move on to their own designs.  I was surprised and delighted when

Kathleen Johnson's design, Alexander, ND

High Gear by Kathleen Johnson, Alexander, ND

Kathleen Johnson, of Alexander, ND brought this terrific quilt into class.  Kathleen had taken my class several years ago when I taught at the North Dakota Quilting Retreat.  She not only completed the quilt, but added many nice touches and lovely machine quilting!

Detail of Kathleen Johnson Quilt

Detail of Kathleen Johnson Quilt

I just love how she used asymmetry to create motion in the circular stars.

Oasis on the Green

Oasis on the Green

Where once a parking lot stood, the City of Houston has created an oasis of green across the street from the George Brown Convention Center.  The gardens were in full regalia during this year’s show and it was a peaceful respite from the goings on inside the center.  What could be more beautiful than

Bird of Paradise Flowers

Bird of Paradise Flowers

a whole bank of bird of paradise flowers!  I hope that I will see some of you there in 2014, the 40th anniversary of International Quilt Festival.

 

 

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International Quilt Festival – New Mexico Quilts in Special Exhibits

What great representation we had from the Land of Enchantment at International Quilt Festival.  Although I tried to photograph as many New Mexico quilts as possible, I am sure that I missed some.  Great job ladies!

Adobe Row, by Michelle Jackson, Albuquerque, NM

Adobe Row, by Michelle Jackson, Albuquerque, NM

Adobe Row was juried into the Tactile Architecture exhibit.  Michelle Jackson writes, “My inspiration is always color and, in this case, using color to show the unique interaction of nature and the adobe.”

Avian Architecture, by Judith Roderick, Placitas, NM

Avian Architecture, by Judith Roderick, Placitas, NM

Judith Roderick is a very well know artist throughout our state.  Her work often features the birds that are her passion and hundreds of buttons that accent her designs.  Judith writes, “The male bowerbird clears a space on the forest floor.  He creates a large structure, a bower, or display area out of twigs, branches, sticks and grasses.  He decorates his bower in an amazing manner using his beak.  He chooses similar colored objects and carefully arranges them to decorate his area.  He chooses flowers, pebbles, moss, berries, and manmade objects, particularly if they are shiny. The drab female then comes and inspects the bower to see if he is a good enough architect and decorator to be her mate.”  This quilt was in the Tactile Architecture exhibit.

Ode to Dad, by Nora Bebee, Rio Rancho, NM.

Ode to Dad, by Nora Bebee, Rio Rancho, NM.

Also exhibited in the Tactile Architecture exhibit was Ode to Dad by Nora Bebee.  She writes, “Doors in New Mexico are not only functional, but pieces of art.  Their structure and elaborate designs fascinated me.  My father was a building contractor and I spent many hours following him on job sites, looking over blueprints, emulating his work in whatever form I could.  It only made sense to me to quilt a door.”

Watermelon Moon, by Patricia Gould , Albuquerque, NM

Watermelon Moon, by Patricia Gould , Albuquerque, NM

Patricia Gould commented that her design inspirations were the Sandhill Cranes wintering in the Rio Grande Valley and the beautiful Sandia Mountains.  She writes, “I’m entranced by the beautiful pink colors of our Sandia Mountains in the winter.  The full moon also turns pink at times.  Sandia means ‘watermelon’ in Spanish so it is easy to see how the mountain range got its name. Sandhill Cranes from Nebraska spend the winter in the Rio Grande Valley in New Mexico.”

Los Mambesis, by Jennifer Day, Santa Fe, NM

Los Mambesis, by Jennifer Day, Santa Fe, NM

Jennifer Day is a well known photographer as well as a quiltmaker.  In Los Mambesis, she writes, “This quilt is based on a photograph I took of an old man on the plaza in CubaLas Mambesis refers to the guerilla Cuban independence soldiers who fought against Spain in the Ten Years War (1868-1878).  This man would have been in his thirties in 1959 when the United States broke off relations with Cuba. Maybe his hat is a comment on international relations! He is a musician playing his instrument on the plaza for free for all to hear.  He is very happy with his craft.”

Eight Ravens, by Judith Roderick, Placitas, NM

Eight Ravens, by Judith Roderick, Placitas, NM

Another of Judith’s trademark quilts featuring birds, this time the playful raven.  She writes, “I love watching ravens flying and wheeling through the big blue New Mexico sky and sitting on telephone poles as I drive along. A friend is a wildlife rehabilitator so I have spent much time with Po, her raven.  I have sketched him repeated and taken his portait as he exhibits his particular behaviors.  In this quilt, I have shown him in many of his guises, flying, standing, squawking against a background of a southwestern landscape.”

Geology, by Lorraine Hollingsworth, Albuquerque, NM

Geology, by Lorraine Hollingsworth, Albuquerque, NM

Lorraine writes. “Geology is inspired by the many layers and colors of the New Mexico landscape, from the soaring red rocks to the rivers and meadows and all the layers in between.”

Chaco 1, by Sally Wright ,Los Angeles, CA

Chaco 1, by Sally Wright, Los Angeles, CA

Okay, so this quilt was NOT made by a New Mexico quilter, but it was inspired by a trip to New Mexico, so it deserves to be included in this post.  Chaco 1, by Sally Wright was inspired by the makers trip to the iconic Chaco Canyon.  Sally writes, “Several years ago, my husband and I visited remote, starkly beautiful and mysterious Chaco Canyon in the Four Corners area of New Mexico.  There we were, fascinated by the distinct architecture of this ancient trading and religious center in the middle of the desert where the Chacoan culture flowered between 800-1250 AD.  This quilt was made from photographs of a series of doorways in the Pueblo Bonito.”

Corona, by Betty Busby Albuquerque, NM

Corona, by Betty Busby Albuquerque, NM

And in the silent auction to benefit the International Quilt Association, I found this treasure by Betty Busby, of Albuquerque , NM.  Sadly, I wasn’t there at the end to see how much this little treasure raised for the group.

Abo Canyon, by Gail Garber, Donna Barnitz and Michele Hymel

Abo Canyon, by Gail Garber, Donna Barnitz and Michele Hymel

Lastly, there was our quilt, hanging in the exhibit, “In the American Tradittion.”  Abo Canyon Memories was inspired by my love of the Ganado Red style of Navajo Rugs typical of northern Arizona.

Thank you for joining me on a mini-tour of the quilts on exhibit at International Quilt Festival.  It was one spectacular show and I was privileged to be a part of the faculty.

See you there next year!

 

 

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International Quilt Festival: IQA Competiton – New Mexico Quilts

I love New Mexico!  It’s called the Land of Enchantment for a good reason and I embrace all of those reasons.  Many times, our state is overlooked by some while others seem to be unaware that we are a state at all.  New Mexico has a thriving and talented cadre of quiltmakers statewide.  The breadth and depth of their artistic talents deserve to be showcased.  I was so proud to photograph many New Mexico made quilts at International Quilt Festival, both in the competition and also in the special exhibits.  Below are four of the quilts that appeared in the IQA competitive exhibit.

Breaking Out, by Kathy Tolbert, Santa Fe, NM

Breaking Out, by Kathy Tolbert, Santa Fe, NM

Kathy Tolbert writes, “I often use small squares in pieced quilts.  I chose to let the small squares be the focus of this design.  The quarter-inch ‘shadows’ vary in color and value as they progress downward.  Since the squares ‘break out,’ I quilted is with five unique ‘arms’ that span all three panels.”  This hung in the Innovative Pieced category.

Dragon Blossoms, by Vicki Conley, Ruidoso Downs, NM

Dragon Blossoms, by Vicki Conley, Ruidoso Downs, NM

The colors in this quilt by Vicki Conley epitomize New Mexico, from the earthen browns to the brilliant turquoises.  This was entered in the Art Abstract – Small category.  She writes, “I began this original quilt in a Caryl Fallert class, using her technique for developing designs.  When I mirrored my original sketched pattern, an abstract Art Deco-style flower emerged.  The design was pieced with gradation fabrics and enhanced with machine quilting, piping, and bobbin trapunto.”

Green River Sunset ,by Patricia Gould, Albuquerque, NMQ

Green River Sunset ,by Patricia Gould, Albuquerque, NM

Typical of the landscape of the high desert, the muted browns and greens flourish in this beautiful quilt by Patricia Gould.  She writes, “This scene is loosely based on a photo I took in Dinosaur National Monument in southwestern Colorado.”

Larry,  by Jennifer Day, Santa Fe, NM

Larry, by Jennifer Day, Santa Fe, NM

Lastly, for this particular post – but not least, Larry by Jennifer Day, won honorable mention in the Digital Imagery category.  Jennifer writes, “This is a quilt depicting my sewing machine repairman.  I caught this photograph of him as he was repairing my machine one day.  Obviously, Larry loves what he does!  I printed his image on Belgian Linen and covered his head, hands, and sewing machine 100% in 63 different colors of thread.  The background is free-motion embroidery with less than 1/4″ between stitches.”

But, wait!  There are several more New Mexico quilts to show you, all of the ones that hung in the special exhibits.  It’s worth waiting for.

 

 

 

 

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Something to be Thankful For: International Quilt Festival’s Pet Postcards

It seems appropriate to share this post on this Thanksgiving holiday.  I am thankful for all of the kindhearted people to open their hearts and homes to homeless animals.  I could not help but notice one entire Special Exhibit at International Quilt Festival.  The quilts were all about Dogs and Cats, each one cuter than the previous one!

Doggieminiums, by Pauline Salzman, Treasure Island, FL

Doggieminiums, by Pauline Salzman, Treasure Island, FL

At first glance, Doggieminiums by Pauline Salzman, appears to be a dog house quilt.  But on closer inspection charming little dog fabrics were inserted into many of the houses and most of the fabrics were dog prints of some sort.  Dog are one of my most favorite animals in the world and my house is home to my two current rescue dogs, Gabby and Miss Elaenia, both Cairn Terriers.  In addition to the Cairns, nine feathered kids, a.k.a. raptors, all of whom have a disability that permanently prevents their release to the wild, also call this place home (but they live in large flight cages out back, with heated perches and water bowls).

Doggieminiums Detail

Doggieminiums Detail

Pauline writes about her quilt, “The rules are different here.  No one over 120 pounds.  Howling and barking are allowed before 10 p.m.  No growling is ever permitted.  Poop patrol is provided and there is a grooming and nail salon on site.  Pool at the club house is always open, no peeing in the pool  All doggie doors on ‘garage'; dog houses must be closed at dusk for the night . . . Association fees are one bone per month, penalty if late.  Late fees are one more bone.”

Pet Postcards

Pet Postcards That Came Home with Yours Truly

Pet Postcards raises funds by selling fabric postcards with  100% of the proceeds go to Friends For Life, Houston’s only no-kill animal shelter and rescue organization.  It’s the brain child of Pokey Bolton,  the Chief Creative Officer at Quilts, Inc., the company that puts on all of the International Quilt Festivals and Markets (among other fun, quilt-y endeavors).  Pokey’s goal for the 2013 International Quilt Festival was to raise $40,000 in the second year of the Festival’s Pet Project.  Would all of us pet lovers purchase enough of the post cards, which were totally adorable, to meet that hope!

Gabby and Miss Elaenia, now longtime, comfortable members of the Garber Family.

Gabby and Miss Elaenia, now longtime, comfortable members of the Garber Family.

The big question was — would we visitors to the largest quilt show in the world buy enough of the little postcards to achieve the goal?  Pokey was nervous!

But thanks to the generosity of quilters from around the world who made more than 1400 fabric postcards, to those who purchased postcards at Quilt Festival, and to those who additionally donated money, in total

THEY RAISED $40,666.18!!!

Pokey writes, “THANK YOU TO EVERYONE FOR HELPING US GET TO THIS AMOUNT!  Thanks to your support, animals who wouldn’t have had a chance at life, will. They will be spayed/neutered, medically attended, cared for in foster situations, and find forever homes.”

Thank you, Pokey and Quilts Inc, for this Pet Project.  I hope that I can make some postcards for next year’s show! For sure, I will be back with wallet in hand!

 

 

 

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International Quilt Festival – IQA Competition – Embellished, Mixed Technique, Innovative Pieced and Traditional Applique

Apparently, I must have been running out of time when I photographed this last set of IQA Competition Quilts (not included the New Mexico Quilts still to come) because it seems as if I skipped around through three different categories.  Note to self:  Take better photos of the signs next year!!  Nonetheless, the quilts below are remarkable and I loved each of them!

A Pocket Full of Paisleys, by Lorilynn King, Longmont, CO

A Pocket Full of Paisleys, by Lorilynn King, Longmont, CO

Lorilynn King writes, “I decided to really learn my embroidery software.  I started digitizing the designs in mid-2010 and began stitching the final version in March of 2012.  The quilt took 10 months to complete.  Background quilting is my own design and was completed before attaching the paisleys.”

Gypsy, by Sharon Schamber, Payson, AZ

Gypsy, by Sharon Schamber, Payson, AZ

When I saw this beauty, I immediately knew that it must be another wonderful Sharon Schamber quilt.  The judges liked it too and awarded it a 2nd place in the Embellished category.  Sharon writes, “This quilt is an exuberant manifestation of the joy I feel as I continue to explore the amazing world of machine embroidery.”

Gypsy Detail

Gypsy Detail

Here’s a detail shot of just a small portion of the masterful embellishment on this quilt.

True North, by Cathy Raines, Skiatook OK

True North, by Cathy Raines, Skiatook OK

I love this one!  Not only is the quilting by Cathy Raines beautifully done, the use of different quilt blocks as part of the landscape adds charm and appeal.  Of course, the row of Flying Geese in the sky is guaranteed to get my attention.  Cathy writes, “This quilt started with a grab bag of challenge fabric.  From strength-stability-grace-honor-family-love-peace and more came the vision for this quilt.  The scripture James 1:17 exemplifies the vision, as all these words are representations of God’s good and perfect gifts.”

Journey Toward Notan, by Jean Freestone, Osprey, FL

Journey Toward Notan, by Jean Freestone, Osprey, FL

The positive-negative aspect of this quilt quickly drew me in.  Jean Freestone writes, “Notan is the Japanese word meaning dark-light, or the interaction between two opposites (yin/yang symbol).  Notan is explored through an exercise called ‘expansion of a square’, expansion meaning to created the mirror image around the the outside edge of a shape using the pattern found in side that shape.  I have expanded circles of traditional Japanese family crests.  The ‘river of life’ background depicts our own journey to achieve balance in our lives.”

OverJOYed, by Flora Joy, Johnson City, TN

OverJOYed, by Flora Joy, Johnson City, TN

How could one not just love the whimsical nature of this totally free-form quilt by Flora Joy!  She writes, “This FUN quilt was designed with astonishing quilting, beautiful embroidery, and a clever message behind each of the quilt’s five layers.  All the designs relate to the letters in the word JOY.  See who can find the greatest number or letter combinations that spell ‘joy’.”

Red Velvet, by Lisa Calle, Pottstown, PA

Red Velvet, by Lisa Calle, Pottstown, PA

Red Velvet Detail

Red Velvet Detail

Another beautiful quilt, this time by Lisa Calle.  The quilting is simply superb as is her use of a limited palette of colors and fabrics.  The contrast created by the combination of the three make this a really lovely quilt.  She writes, “I fell in love with the gray and red fabrics and knew I needed to have them.  I had recently seen a Dresden Plate quilt and though these fabrics were perfect for it.  I used about 5,000 yards of my favorites thread.  It was 100% hand guided on my A-1 Elite.”

Memories of Scarlet Serenade, by Sharon Schamber, Payson, AZ

Memories of Scarlet Serenade, by Sharon Schamber, Payson, AZ

Closing out this post, here’s another beauty by Sharon Shamber, this time in the Mixed Technique category.  Like all of Sharon’s quilts, this one has incredible attention to all detail as evidenced in the photo below.  Some of the finest machine quilting I have ever seen.

Memories of Scarlet Serenade Detail

Memories of Scarlet Serenade Detail

Sharon writes, “Over the past few years, I have been exploring machine embroidery techniques and pushing the limits of what can be done in the hoop.  This quilt is the culmination of that journey.”

Stay tuned!  Although this completes the bulk of the competition quilts, the New Mexico Quilts and the special exhibits are still to come.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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International Quilt Festival – IQA Competition: Mixed Media and Digital Imagery

I apologize for the lapse of posts these last few days.  I have been tied up with my other life, the life of birds.  This weekend is the big Festival of the Cranes down at Bosque del Apache NWR, where I have been leading daily raptor tours of the refuge and giving presentations about hawks, eagles, falcons and owls.  I’m heading down again shortly for today’s presentations, but then tomorrow and Sunday we are scheduled to host an outdoor public outreach booth featuring our live birds of prey.  A giant winter storm is approaching and I have this nightmare vision that we will all be trapped in our hotel for the entire weekend and never even make it down to the refuge.

But, here goes with two more categories.

Kazanoban 2 by Masako Sakagami, Toyama-shi, Japan

Kazanoban 2 by Masako Sakagami, Toyama-shi, Japan

Masako Sakagami writes, “I live in Toyama, Japan.  Festival of Kazenobon celebrates harvest.  Using an old kimono, I used the sewing machine to free-motion the local folk song.”

Kazanoban 2 Detail

Kazanoban 2 Detail

I found this to be a very interesting quilt with considerable detail throughout.  Her technique was to use small pieces of fabric covered with tulle and quilted.

A Work in Progress by Nancy Dickey, Magnolia, TX

A Work in Progress by Nancy Dickey, Magnolia, TX

Nancy Dickey writes, “A large-patterned floral fabric was the inspiration for this quilt.  Its oriental theme brought to mind a Japanese garden.  While thinking of the classic Japanese watercolor landscapes, with their hint of distant mountains, I visualized the idea for my own painting.”

Moon Drunk by Susan Fletcher King, Houston, TX

Moon Drunk by Susan Fletcher King, Houston, TX

Susan Fletcher King writes, “One bonus of living in Houston is using our screened porch all year.  Occasionally, we are lucky enough to watch as the light of the rising moon shows a beautiful trail of small moths and other flying creatures that only come out at night.”

Greetings from Watkins Glen, by Julie Weaver, Mt. Vernon, ME

Greetings from Watkins Glen, by Julie Weaver, Mt. Vernon, ME

Julie Weaver writes, “This Alfa Romeo Formula One race car quilt started life as a photograph I took in 1970.  Later that year, I painted a large oil paining from that photo.  Forty-two years later, I used the painting as my inspirations for a ‘Postcards From Away’ challenge.”

Les Fleurs de la Maladie 2, by Helen Remick, Seattle, WA

Les Fleurs de la Maladie 2, by Helen Remick, Seattle, WA

Helen Remick writes, “These ‘flowers of sickness’ show the damage to my joints from erosive osteoarthritis.  Using a thick batting, and longer and finer needles with metallic thread allows me to continue, for now, the handiwork that I love.”

The breadth and variety of quilts displayed at the International Quilt Association competition is both amazing and overwhelming.  I have enjoyed writing these posts at a more leisurely pace so that I can take the time to better know and understand the talented quiltmakers that create these masterpieces.

More to come — but not until Sunday!

 

 

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